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After the revolt against the Mughal ruler Aurangzeb, the Jat state came into existence

After the revolt against the Mughal ruler Aurangzeb, the Jat state came into existence with the establishment of a powerful Bharatpur state in the 17th century. The rebels were mainly concentrated in the rural areas of the western part of Haryana, Punjab and Ganga Doab, and in the Eastern region there were many small states. These were great warriors along with ancient and medieval farmers who were recruited by the Hindu and Muslim rulers as soldiers.
After the revolt against the Mughal ruler Aurangzeb, the Jat state came into existence with the establishment of a powerful Bharatpur state in the 17th century. The rebels were mainly concentrated in the rural areas of the western part of Haryana, Punjab and Ganga Doab, and in the Eastern region there were many small states. These were great warriors along with ancient and medieval farmers who were recruited by the Hindu and Muslim rulers as soldiers.

Some ambitious Jat landlords of the Agra region also fought with the Mughals, Rajputs and the Afghans because they wanted to establish a free state of Jat landlord. Surajmal was the only Jat leader, who organized the scattered jats as a powerful state. The details of some of the prominent Jat leaders are as follows:

Gokla: It was the landowner of Tilpat which led the Jat rebellion in 1669. But the revolt was suppressed by Mughal governor Hasan Ali and Gokala died.
Rajaram: He was the landowner of Sinsna who led the Jat rebellion in 1685. This revolt was suppressed by Raja Bishan Singh Kachwaha of Ammar.
Chudaman: It was Rajaram's nephew that defeated the Mughals in 1704 and captured Sisheni. It established the state of Bharatpur and Bahadur Shah gave it to him. It supported the Mughals in the Mughal campaign against Banda Bahadur.
Badan Singh: He was the nephew of Chudaman, who was given the title of King Ahmad Shah Abdali. He is considered as the real founder of Jat State Bharatpur.
Surajmal: It was the son adopted by Badan Singh. It is also said that jat power is also called Plato and Jat Aflal because he had conveyed the Jat state to the climax. He led Jat campaigns in the areas of Delhi, Agra and Mewand and also agreed to assist the Marathas in the third battle of Panipat. He was murdered by the Pathans near Delhi.

Conclusion

Due to disintegration of the Mughals in the 17th century, a new warrior caste emerged in the form of jats, who declared themselves descendants of Indo-Sionians who entered India from Central Asia. Although he formed the state, his internal structure remained the same as the Tribal Union.

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